Cocker goes quietly, fans miss him at airport

 

Sold out

Cocker, who was ordered out of the country after he pleaded guilty to drug charges in Adelaide, was allowed by the Immigration Minister, Dr Forbes, to leave Australia of his own accord on the first available plane.

The delay allowed the group to give two more concerts in Melbourne on Friday night, cutting down the heavy financial loss.

As it was, Cocker left without giving his planned concerts in Brisbane and Perth, all of which were sold out.

The controversial star, who arrived at Tullamarine Airport, Melbourne, about 20 minutes before he was due to board his plane, said he did not know whether he would be allowed to enter the United States.

Cocker’s manager, Mr Nigel Thomas, said everything had been arranged to go through the United States. When asked if the group would be allowed to land in the US, Mr Thomas said: “Everything’s fine this time.”

Cocker and about 12 members of his travelling group arrived at Melbourne Airport in a fleet of cars. Hundreds of teenage fans and a large number of TV and press reporters mobbed the star as he stepped from the car. Cocker said he believed the authorities had handled the whole situation badly.

“I believe I was given a raw deal and someone squealed on me when I was busted in Adelaide,” he said.

Cocker said he did not know whether he would return to contest the appeal against his Adelaide conviction.

Appeal out?

Asked why he was appealing against the Adelaide sentence after he had already pleaded guilty to the charges, he said it was because of the deportation order.

“We wanted to appeal against the deportation order but we found we couldn’t so then we took the other line,” Cocker said.

“I don’t really want to have to come back for the appeal. We may even drop it.”

Asked about his performance at his opening concert in Melbourne when he drank champagne, whisky and beer on stage, Cocker said: “I don’t do it every night.

“I got angry – it was a couple of your bottles of cream sherry.

“I was not excessively boozed, though.”

Cocker said he did not know what his future would be when he returned home, adding: “We hope to make a few records.”

Mr Thomas said later he believed the tour would break even.

In Britain and the United States, meanwhile, managers of top pop groups scoffed at suggestions that future Australian tours would be threatened by his experiences here.

The manager of top US band, Three Dog Night, Mr John Halsall, said in London yesterday:

“The general feeling is that Cocker brought the trouble on himself and will have to accept the consequences.

He said there was “no way” that the group he manages wouldn’t tour Australia as planned next month.

Mr Keith Altham, manager of the English groups The Who, Humble Pie and Emerson, Lake and Palmer agreed: “Cocker is prone to trouble — and everyone else knows it.

Loading

“I feel it is very unlikely that any groups will cancel Australian tours just because of this trouble. ”

A member of a US rock group said in New York yesterday:

“It’s obvious that any group going to Australia in the future will be told to watch their behaviour.”

Respectable

Only one man – the road manager for top English group, Yes – agreed with Cocker. Mr Mike Tate, formerly of Melbourne, said:

“The Yes tour of Australia is definitely on, but the police could now have it in for pop groups.

“There is nothing like a police raid to tarnish an otherwise respectable image,” he said.

 

Sold out

Cocker, who was ordered out of the country after he pleaded guilty to drug charges in Adelaide, was allowed by the Immigration Minister, Dr Forbes, to leave Australia of his own accord on the first available plane.

The delay allowed the group to give two more concerts in Melbourne on Friday night, cutting down the heavy financial loss.

As it was, Cocker left without giving his planned concerts in Brisbane and Perth, all of which were sold out.

The controversial star, who arrived at Tullamarine Airport, Melbourne, about 20 minutes before he was due to board his plane, said he did not know whether he would be allowed to enter the United States.

Cocker’s manager, Mr Nigel Thomas, said everything had been arranged to go through the United States. When asked if the group would be allowed to land in the US, Mr Thomas said: “Everything’s fine this time.”

Cocker and about 12 members of his travelling group arrived at Melbourne Airport in a fleet of cars. Hundreds of teenage fans and a large number of TV and press reporters mobbed the star as he stepped from the car. Cocker said he believed the authorities had handled the whole situation badly.

“I believe I was given a raw deal and someone squealed on me when I was busted in Adelaide,” he said.

Cocker said he did not know whether he would return to contest the appeal against his Adelaide conviction.

Appeal out?

Asked why he was appealing against the Adelaide sentence after he had already pleaded guilty to the charges, he said it was because of the deportation order.

“We wanted to appeal against the deportation order but we found we couldn’t so then we took the other line,” Cocker said.

“I don’t really want to have to come back for the appeal. We may even drop it.”

Asked about his performance at his opening concert in Melbourne when he drank champagne, whisky and beer on stage, Cocker said: “I don’t do it every night.

“I got angry – it was a couple of your bottles of cream sherry.

“I was not excessively boozed, though.”

Cocker said he did not know what his future would be when he returned home, adding: “We hope to make a few records.”

Mr Thomas said later he believed the tour would break even.

In Britain and the United States, meanwhile, managers of top pop groups scoffed at suggestions that future Australian tours would be threatened by his experiences here.

The manager of top US band, Three Dog Night, Mr John Halsall, said in London yesterday:

“The general feeling is that Cocker brought the trouble on himself and will have to accept the consequences.

He said there was “no way” that the group he manages wouldn’t tour Australia as planned next month.

Mr Keith Altham, manager of the English groups The Who, Humble Pie and Emerson, Lake and Palmer agreed: “Cocker is prone to trouble — and everyone else knows it.

Loading

“I feel it is very unlikely that any groups will cancel Australian tours just because of this trouble. ”

A member of a US rock group said in New York yesterday:

“It’s obvious that any group going to Australia in the future will be told to watch their behaviour.”

Respectable

Only one man – the road manager for top English group, Yes – agreed with Cocker. Mr Mike Tate, formerly of Melbourne, said:

“The Yes tour of Australia is definitely on, but the police could now have it in for pop groups.

“There is nothing like a police raid to tarnish an otherwise respectable image,” he said.

 

 

Denial of responsibility! Quick Telecast is an automatic aggregator of the all world’s media. In each content, the hyperlink to the primary source is specified. All trademarks belong to their rightful owners, all materials to their authors. If you are the owner of the content and do not want us to publish your materials, please contact us by email – info@quicktelecast.com. The content will be deleted within 24 hours.
(Visited 1 times, 1 visits today)

Leave A Comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *